Caring for the caregiver

Wisconsin's Family Caregiver Support Programs provide information, support, and resources to people who need help caring for a family member, friend, or neighbor.

Are you a caregiver?

We all wear many hats.  But often, we don't recognize ourselves as caregivers — even when we're doing all the things that caregivers do.  Take this quiz and decide for yourself if you are a family caregiver. 

Signs a caregiver may need help

When a family caregiver is caring for someone, they often put the needs of that person ahead of their own.  Over time, the challenges of caregiving can take a toll on the physical and mental health of the caregiver.  Click here for the warning signs that a caregiver may need some help.

Looking for some help? 

Family caregiver support programs connect caregivers with the kinds of help they need such as: 

Caregiver education: Many caregivers wonder if they're "doing it right" when it comes to caring for someone.  Find information and programs that help caregivers feel more confident providing care. 

Respite care: When a caregiver needs a break from caring for someone, respite care (having someone else take over caregiving duties for a period of time) can provide needed assistance.

Support groups: Caregiver support groups give people a chance to talk about the challenges of caregiving,  connect with others who are dealing with some of the same issues, and get information and assistance with their caregiving dilemmas. 

Support services: There are a variety of support services available in most communities to help a person live independently in the community. 

Adult day services: These facilities provide care for someone who cannot stay alone during the day.

Home health care and personal care: These care services are provided to people in their own homes and are intended to help people stay in their own homes and communities as long as possible.

Financial and legal assistance: Get help navigating the sometimes complicated requirements for getting financial assistance for the person needing care and learn more about the legal issues to be aware of surrounding family caregiving. 

Living options: There are many different living options for a person who needs care or support.  Learn more about the types of care and where to find them.

Case management: Case managers are often used when a person's care becomes complex, when a caregiver doesn't live near the person needing care, or when the caregiver simply needs help navigating the long-term support system to ensure that their loved one receives the best care possible.  

Header Image: 

Family Caregiver Support Programs provide information, support and resources to people caring for someone who is:

  • age 60 or older; or diagnosed with
  • Alzheimer's disease and related disorders regardless of age.

We also help grandparents (or relatives age 55 or older) who care for:

  • a child under age 19
  • a relative with a disability who is 19 to 59 years of age.